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Is Your Child Falling Behind?

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  • Developing Language Skills through Human Interaction

    Home is where our story begins…” so the argument that a child’s early experiences at home perpetuate social inequality is understandably contentious. That controversy garnered new attention in 1995 when researchers Betty Hart and Todd Risley reported that children of highly educated, professional parents heard many more words addressed to them than children of less educated parents.

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  • Tuning into the Radio can Impact Older People’s Wellbeing

    For some, listening to the radio is a way to kill time while driving or catch up on the day’s news, but for older adults the desire to tune in might have deeper implications.

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  • Gardening with Young Children Helps Their Development

    May is the perfect time of year in Michigan to start a gardening project with your children. Gardening with children provides the perfect combination of skills and tasks to address your child’s development. For example, gardening is a great physical development activity.

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  • TV Subtitles Boost Literacy

    Government is too 'reticent' about advising parents how to help children learn at home, says former education secretary.

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  • Parenting a Child with Invisible Learning Differences

    My gorgeous daughter is nine years old and to look at her you would not notice anything out of the ordinary. She was diagnosed with Dyspraxia (Developmental Coordination Disorder) aged 5, following an NHS Occupational Therapy assessment which placed her motor skills in the lowest possible category. Dyspraxia is primarily a disorder of planning and executing sequences of movement, yet despite the diagnostic focus on movement, it is also so much more than this. Medical circles use the term ‘developmental coordination disorder’ but the emphasis on motor skills ignores the wide ranging impact of Dyspraxia on many other areas.

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  • What We Can Learn, as Parents form the Longest Study on Childhood Development

    For the past 70 years, scientists in Britain have been studying thousands of children through their lives to find out why some end up happy and healthy while others struggle. It's the longest-running study of human development in the world, and it's produced some of the best-studied people on the planet while changing the way we live, learn and parent. Reviewing this remarkable research, science journalist Helen Pearson shares some important findings and simple truths about life and good parenting.

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  • Behaviour as a Form of Communication – What’s the Issue?

    There's been quite a lot of discussion in the Twittersphere, on and off in recent months about the notion that "(all) behaviour is a form of communication". I've bracketed the word "all" here quite deliberately, as I think it is part of the problem, and will come back to that later.

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  • Reading Activities and Games for all Ages

    Want to make learning to read and write even more adventurous? There are many learning games and activities that will not only help your child or teen to become more successful in school, but will also be fun to play. Most of these activities can easily be created at home. Please note that many of the activities that follow can apply to different ability levels with just a few changes.

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  • Writing for Dyslexic Wellbeing

    Writing helps me take care of myself, practically and emotionally. In this blog post, I’d like to tell you about 3 things I write and how they help me. I share good practice with other dyslexic adults by writing blog posts, magazine articles and tips guides. I find helping my peers exhilarating, confidence-boosting and emotionally healing. The guidance I write also lets me identify and harness things I can do to self-manage my own dyslexia.

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  • Interesting How the UK is Helping Youth with Communication Disorders

    Ryan Griffiths is struggling. He has to "make reparation", because the police have said so – he damaged a car – but he does not know what it means. "I'm on my last chance," says Griffiths (not his real name), 17, from Bolton, to his speech and language therapist, Ian Warriner. "The next time something happens, it won't be good."

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